Spas are places of serenity and pampering, though any spa manager will agree that running one can be anything but serene. Three successful spa owners shared insights into how they take the tension out of running their businesses at Vagaro’s iconic.22 conference. 

Panelists covered a range of current topics in the wellness industry. Inclusivity is of particular importance to panelist Patricio Battani, who provides electrolysis for members of Hawaii’s trans community at his business, HI SIS Spa. Electrolysis is integral to gender-affirming care, and Battani described the gender euphoria his clients experience after receiving it. 

“That is one of the most beautiful things you’ll ever see, and knowing I did that for them is huge,” he said. 

Like what you see? Watch the full session HERE!

 

All agreed on the role that the wellness industry plays in mental health for people of all demographics, especially following the pandemic. Panelist Douglas Janczyn, owner of Manscape Spa in British Columbia, takes this role seriously. Janczyn is one of the few in his field in Western Canada to offer spa services exclusively to men—who, statistically, don’t spend much time on their self-care. 

“I always educate men on why they need my services, and the more you educate in this business, the more money you can make,” Janczyn said. 

Speakers shared how they keep their revenue streams strong despite inflation, highlighting the importance of selling recurring memberships. Panelist Anita Chan, owner of Anita B Spa in San Francisco, warned against adjusting prices too drastically. 

“At the end of the day, we provide good services for our clients, and we shouldn’t undervalue ourselves,” said Chan. 

Other tips the panelists offered to spa professionals ranged from keeping their spas immaculate to finding their professional niche. They all agreed that members of the wellness industry should think of one another as colleagues instead of competitors. 

“Things can get catty and competitive, but there’s enough skin out there for everybody,” Chan said. “We are a tight community and should empower one another.”